Sunday, October 4, 2015

Othello Act 5 Summary Response Outline

Summary Response Outline

Summary:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea
  • In the writing of Othello, Shakespeare clearly depicts how jealousy can rule one’s decisions and actions.
  • Supporting ideas to prove main ideas
  • In Act 5 of Othello, Iago’s jealousy has driven him to the point of convincing Roderigo to kill Cassio, and Othello to kill Desdemona.
  • Explanation of ideas
  • Iago’s actions and decisions are controlled by his jealousy and need for revenge, and it affects everyone around him. When Roderigo fails to kill Cassio, Iago kills Roderigo, and also kills his own wife Emilia when she tells of his lies.
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
  • Shakespeare clearly depicts how jealousy rules one’s decisions and actions.
  • Only third person
  • Supporting ideas
    • no quotes
  • facts; no opinions
  • Explain ideas
  • Concise
  • Attribute ideas back to author
  • No plot
  • In your own words

Response:
  • Make an argument
  • take a position (correctly or incorrectly portrays)

  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, agree/disagree (correctly portrays/ incorrectly portrays), because ___________ and ______________
  • In Act 5 of Othello, Shakespeare illustrates how jealousy rules one’s actions and decisions, because it can lead to an escalation of events until it results in death.
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up
    • At the beginning of Act 5, Iago is planning how Roderigo will kill Cassio, at the same moment Othello is waiting to kill Desdemona. Cassio and Roderigo are both wounded, but neither are dead. Iago kills Roderigo to keep him from talking, and makes it seem as if he was protecting Cassio.
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Iago says to himself, “Now, whether he kill Cassio, Or Cassio him, or each do kill the other, Every way make my gain,” (Shakespeare 5.1. 13-15).
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
    • Iago is saying that it does not matter much the outcome of the fight, because either way will be a win for him. This correctly portrays how Iago’s jealousy controlled his actions so that he set up a scene that could only end with a murder.
  • Counterclaim 1: However, ....
    • Set-up
    • However, Act 5 of Othello also shows that it is not always jealousy that controls one’s decisions and actions to the point of death. This is proved through Othello’s killing of Desdemona. Othello killed Desdemona out of anger rather than jealousy.
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Othello tells Desdemona that the reason for his actions is because she was unfaithful to him, “By heaven, I saw my handkerchief in’s hand. O perjured woman! thou dost stone my heart, And makest me call what I intend to do A murder, which I thought a sacrifice: I saw the handkerchief” (Shakespeare 5.2. 73-77).
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim
    • Othello says that he is forced to kill Desdemona because of what she did to him. He does not want to kill her much, but is so angered by her supposed “cheating”, that he believes he has no other option but to punish her with death.
  • Claim 2:
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
  • Counterclaim 2: Although, ....
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim
  • What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument?
  • At first glance it appears that many in Act 5 of Othello are caused by anger. At first glance this position seems reasonable because more often than not, crimes such as murders, are committed as an act of anger. But after taking a closer look, it is clear that nearly all of the murders in Act 5 of Othello were a result of jealousy controlling one’s decisions and actions. The death of Roderigo was an indirect result of Iago’s jealousy of Cassio, and Desdemona’s death was because of Othello’s jealousy toward Cassio for an imaginary affair. These murders were either a direct, or indirect result of jealousy in some form or another.
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
  • In Act 5 of Othello, Shakespeare clearly depicts how jealousy can control one’s actions and decisions.